writing

Fall Writing Updates

Were you thinking just now that an update on my recent writings is past due? You’re correct. It turns out that updates of that sort are about the only thing I haven’t been writing of late.

  • The best (and most popular) of my recent Reason columns focuses on sales of food via the Facebook Marketplace. For the column, I bravely purchased and ate some spectacular homemade tamales that I tracked down using the social network.

  • My latest article for the New Food Economy, published last month, explores how the Trump administration is quietly advancing many of the Obama administration’s food policies.

  • This afternoon, I sent off final edits to my forthcoming Loyola Consumer Law Review article on how social-media tools can help us to assess consumer perceptions of class-action food litigation. The article follows my appearance as an invited panelist at the law review's spring symposium.

I have some other news that’s not yet ripe for sharing. For now, I’ll say only that it involves a manner of writing that rhymes with “diction.”

Food Law Speaking, Writing, & Teaching Updates

I recently returned from Los Angeles, where I served as a guest faculty member at UCLA Law School, which played host to law students from around the country as part of the Food Law Student Leadership Summit. It's my third year of teaching at the (now) three-year old summit, which brings together smart and interested Food Law & Policy students from around the country for a series of seminars, lectures, and workshops on a variety of food-law topics.

My seminar at UCLA focused on the law as it applies to foraging (e.g., for mushrooms), which is the subject of one of two law review articles I'm currently writing. The foraging article will appear in an upcoming edition of the Fordham Urban Law Journal. The other article, which I wrote with my frequent collaborator Emily Broad Leib, is an update to our 2014 article on the field of Food Law & Policy. The earlier article appeared in the Wisconsin Law Review. Our current article will be published by the Journal of Food Law & Policy.

I've also been working on other writing assignments of late. One such article is out in print but not yet online. It's an essay for the American Bar Association's GP Solo magazine. The article focuses on federal GMO regulation. Here's an ABA summary of my article.

Did you ever wonder where your food comes from? GMOs Engender Passion (and That’s a Poor Basis for Lawmaking) by Baylen J. Linnekin explains what is a genetically modified organism and discusses current laws pertaining to GMO agriculture and foods (including a recent federal GMO-labeling law). Linnekin also explains the role of three U.S. agencies (the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, and Environmental Protection Agency) in regulating GMO agriculture and food and highlights recent and ongoing controversies pertaining to GMOs. The author argues that people are free to tout what they believe are the wonders or horrors of GMO foods and discusses whether the government’s policy on GMOs should be a neutral one.

Did you ever wonder where your food comes from? GMOs Engender Passion (and That’s a Poor Basis for Lawmaking) by Baylen J. Linnekin explains what is a genetically modified organism and discusses current laws pertaining to GMO agriculture and foods (including a recent federal GMO-labeling law). Linnekin also explains the role of three U.S. agencies (the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, and Environmental Protection Agency) in regulating GMO agriculture and food and highlights recent and ongoing controversies pertaining to GMOs. The author argues that people are free to tout what they believe are the wonders or horrors of GMO foods and discusses whether the government’s policy on GMOs should be a neutral one.

Stay tuned for a link to my ABA article once it's live online. If you're starved for Food Law & Policy readings, check out this piece from the recent Washington Lawyer magazine that quotes me and several colleagues.

Finally, here's an update on my upcoming speaking appearances. In January, I'll be giving a book talk at University of Washington Law School as part of the school's Social Justice Tuesdays. The talk is co-sponsored by the law school's Food Law & Policy Association and its Environmental Law Group. In March, I'll travel to Ann Arbor to give a book talk at University of Michigan Law School. That talk is co-sponsored by the school's Federalist Society chapter and its Food Law Society.

That's all for now. I expect that I'll have more updates next month.

Find Me Writing, Speaking, and Gleaning

I'm pleased to provide an update here on some of my recent and ongoing work.

My latest piece for the New Food Economy was published today. In the lengthy article--which runs around 4,000 words--I describe details of a fascinating recall of potentially hazardous egg rolls last year, explain the role previously unreported FDA and USDA bickering played in the recall, and describe the complex and confusing overlap of agency regulatory authority. I'm very happy with the piece, which I think really pops thanks to documents I obtained through a FOIA request I filed with the USDA in November. I also continue to write weekly for Reason. Please check out my columns here.

On the speaking front, my fall calendar is also quite busy already. I'll be conducting a book talk and webinar for Northwestern University Alumni Association on Sept. 28. I'm a proud alum of Northwestern's School of Education and Social Policy (MA '01). In October, I'll be in Wisconsin for the annual meeting of the board of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, where I'm a board member. I'll then travel to New York City, where I'll first give a book talk at St. John's University Law School (Oct. 19) and then discuss an article I'm writing about foraging as part of Fordham Urban Law Journal's annual Cooper-Walsh Colloquium (Oct. 20). The following week, I'll deliver a book in Seattle to a group of home economists, Euthenics of the Greater Seattle Area. And in November I'll again take part (for the third year in a row) as a guest faculty member at the annual Food Law Student Leadership Summit. This year's summit is hosted by UCLA Law School.

Finally, I'm thrilled to report on some volunteer work I've done in recent months with a terrific Seattle nonprofit, FareStart. I serve as a Food Recovery Ambassador and Food Recovery Committee member with FareStart as they work to expand their outreach to farmers and food hubs in service of reducing food waste, combating food insecurity, and training culinary professionals. Additionally, I take part in FareStart’s volunteer gleaning efforts. I've had the good fortune to reach out to farms and food hubs about recovering excess food, helped to plan FareStart's food-recovery efforts, and visited farms outside Seattle to pick excess produce. I've already helped glean nearly 200 lbs. of blueberries that FareStart has turned into food its budding culinary professionals serve to Seattleites in need.